Right to Unionize for Ride Share Drivers

An Act establishing a transportation network driver bill of rights/An Act establishing collective bargaining rights for TNC drivers - H.1099 - S.627

  • enables rideshare drivers, such as those working for Uber or Lyft, to unionize

  • reaffirms the status of drivers for Transportation Networked Companies (TNC) and Delivery Networked Companies (DNC) as employees.

This bill reaffirms the status of drivers for Transportation Networked Companies (TNC) and Delivery Networked Companies (DNC), such as rideshare drivers, as employees.It would determine minimum wage guarantees and benefit entitlements and provide drivers with new rights and protections on the job, including the ability to fight improper deactivation, failure to assign work, and improper payments.

By misclassifying drivers as independent contractors, Uber and Lyft are denying their drivers basic protections under the Massachusetts Wage and Hour Laws. Many drivers are not even guaranteed the state minimum wage or overtime because the companies don’t pay them for time spent between rides or reimburse them for necessary business expenses such as fuel, vehicle maintenance, and insurance.

The bill would grant the Department of Public Utilities broad oversight authority to set rates and establishes service quality metrics.

Finally, it would provide drivers all the protections afforded to workers under existing state employment laws as well as the federal Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).

The Commonwealth has been engaged in ongoing litigation suing Uber and Lyft for misclassifying their employees as independent conotractors. The lawsuit has brought to light national implications, and Massachusetts can be a model for proper labor protections for drivers.

the decision makers

Joint Committee on Financial Services

Who on committee has co-sponsored:

state senators:

Paul Feeneyred x
Paul Feeney (D)
Foxborough

chair

Michael Moorered x
Michael Moore (D)
Millbury

chair

John Croningreen check
John Cronin (D)
Jacob Oliveirared x
Jacob Oliveira (D)
Susan Moranred x
Susan Moran (D)
Bruce Tarrred x
Bruce Tarr (R)
Gloucester

state representatives:

James Murphyred x
James Murphy (D)
Weymouth

chair

Bruce Ayersred x
Bruce Ayers (D)
Quincy

chair

Christopher Flanaganred x
Christopher Flanagan (D)
Kate Lipper-Garabedianred x
Kate Lipper-Garabedian (D)
Ryan Hamiltongreen check
Ryan Hamilton (D)
Methuen
Smitty Pignatelligreen check
Smitty Pignatelli (D)
Lee
Sally Keransred x
Sally Kerans (D)
Simon Cataldored x
Simon Cataldo (D)
Acton
Steve Owensgreen check
Steve Owens (D)
Michael Soterred x
Michael Soter (R)
Bellingham
Nicholas Boldygared x
Nicholas Boldyga (R)
Southwick

Who has co-sponsored:

History of the bill

2025

Feb 2024

Reporting date extended to July 31, 2024

2024

Nov 2023

Joint committee hearing held

Feb 2023

Referred to the Joint Committee on Financial Services

Jan 2023

Bill re-filed as H.1099/S.666

2023

Jun 2022

Sent to Study (Study Order: S.2918)

May 2022

Reporting date extended to 7/15/2022

Feb 2022

Reporting date extended to 5/13/2022

2022

Sep 2021

Hearing held

Mar 2021

Referred to the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development

Mar 2021

Bill re-filed as H.1953/S.1224

Jan 2021

No further action taken by Senate Ways and Means

2021

Jun 2020

Accompanied a new draft, S.2778 and reported favorably by the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development; referred to Senate Ways and Means

Jan 2020

Reporting date extended to 6/5/2020

2020

Jun 2019

Hearing held

Jan 2019

Referred to the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development

Jan 2019

Bill re-filed as S.1090

Jan 2019

No further action taken by Senate Ways and Means

2019

Mar 2018

Bill reported favorably by the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development and referred to Senate Ways and Means

2018

Nov 2017

Hearing held

Jan 2017

Referred to the Joint Committee on Labor and Workforce Development

Jan 2017

Bill filed as S.1022

2017